Earth Hour – Saving our planet one hour at a time

Moscow Kremlin fell into Darkness for Earth Hour
«Moscow Kremlin fell into Darkness for Earth Hour» - See picture in album Picture of a Day

Once a year, all around the world, you can notice the lights dimming in many city areas and landmarks, people gathering with candles and chanting slogans. You might think what is being described is a blackout or global electronic disruption of some sort, but this is not the case. On March 29, 2014, people from all corners of the world unite to celebrate Earth Day, though sometimes activists opt for a shorter Earth hour. This is a global environmental campaign geared on raising public awareness of ecological problems and making an impact, however small it may seem.

So how does the event work? The answer is quite simple: anyone concerned about the Earth’s environmental situation can take part and engage in any actions that can improve the environment, even for a short time. Usually, this is done by cutting electric supplies throughout the city, using candles and preserving much needed water. This year, a great number of cities and countries supported the cause, and the examples are clear and impactful. National monuments all over the world like the Kremlin, Times Square, Eiffel Tower, and many other landmarks dimmed their lights, preserving thousands of Watts and sending a clear message to the population.

 This unorthodox celebration was started in Australia in 2007 by Andy Ridley. Garnering support from major organizations like the UN and WWF, the popularity of Earth Hour has rapidly grown, now being celebrated by millions, even in some of the most remote places on the planet. What is special about Earth Day is that it’s about more than just some preserved electricity, it’s mainly concerned with the moral and mental impact the event achieves.  Once a person recognizes the adverse effects they are having on the environment, they have a much bigger exposition towards improving that place and if possible, many others like it.

Related Photos:

 Moscow Kremlin fell into Darkness for Earth Hour
«Moscow Kremlin fell into Darkness for Earth Hour» - See photo in Gallery

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Arthur Lookyanov

My name's Arthur Lookyanov, I'm a private tour guide, personal driver and photographer in Moscow, Russia. I work in my business and run my website Moscow-Driver.com from 2002. Read more about me and my services, check out testimonials of my former business and travel clients from all over the World, hit me up on Twitter or other social websites. I hope that you will like my photos as well.

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